Perfect Discipline

By my understanding — the Buddha, Jesus, and Krishna — all advocate striving towards perfection by utilizing self-discipline.

First, what is perfection? To be perfect, is to be complete, flawless, and beyond improvement. God is by definition perfect because God is the container in which all things reside — God is complete, lacking nothing. Perfection therefore, cannot be applied to anything within our world because everything here exists in an environment of growth and decay — nothing is complete.

But although perfection is not possible within this world, we’re told that striving for it should be the focus of our efforts. And if we approach the limits of perfection in this realm, we achieve complete perfection in the next realm, the plane of existence beyond this one. And by achieving perfection, we become indistinguishable from that which is perfect, we become one with God.

How do we approach perfection in this world? What is perfect, but God, so God serves as the role-model of perfection. In other words, to be perfect is to be like God. For instance, just as God freely gives the world to all, we must also freely give to all. And as God creates and maintains all things within this world, we must fondly accept it all, just as a creator would, despising nothing. And as God performs his role as creator, we must accept and fulfill our role, whatever it may be. And as God resides beyond this world, we must also see our home as beyond this world, maintaining a level of detachment from this fleeting realm of the senses.

What is self-discipline? Self-discipline is simply the constant and repetitive practice of suppressing and directing one’s thoughts. Like sculpting a lump of clay, we must pull and prod our thoughts into a work of art. We must persistently observe our thoughts, reigning them in when they stray from the path of perfection, encouraging focus. And so it is in this way, that one may approach perfection.

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